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Select Your Trip Footprint Of Buddha

Holy Places of Lord Buddha

Lumbini

Birth place of Siddhartha Gautama, situated at Nepal, very closed to the Bhairwan Border between India and Nepal. 
Siddhartha Gautama lived roughly between 623 and 543 BC and he founded Buddhism as Gautama Buddha. Lumbini was where the Buddha lived until the age of 29. Lumbini has a number of temples, including the Mayadevi temple and others under construction. Also located here is the Puskarini or Holy Pond where the Buddha's mother took the ritual dip prior to his birth and where he, too, had his first bath, as well as the remains of Kapilavastu palace.

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Rajgir

It is situated at 80 Ks from Patna, capital headquarter of Bihar. Rajgir was the first capital of the kingdom of Magadha, a state that would eventually evolve into the Mauryan Empire. Its date of origin is unknown, although ceramics dating to about 1000 BC have been found in the city. 
It was here that Gautama Buddha spent several months meditating, and preaching at Gridhra-kuta, ('Hill of the Vultures'). He also delivered some of his famous sermons and initiated king Bimbisara of Magadha and countless others to Buddhism. On one of the hills is the Saptparni cave where the First Buddhist Council was held under the leadership of Maha Kassapa. Lord Mahavira spent fourteen years of his life at Rajgir and Nalanda, spending chaturmas (04 months of the rainy season) at a single place in Rajgir and the rest in the places in the vicinity. It was the capital of his favorite follower king Shrenik.

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Bodh - Gaya

Bodh Gaya is a religious site and place of pilgrimage associated with Lord Buddha situated at Bihar, Eastern part of India
It is famous as the place where Gautama Buddha is said to have obtained Enlightenment.

Buddha Gaya is the most hallowed place on earth to Buddhists the world over. Situated by the bank of river Neranjana the place was then known as Uruwela. King Ashoka was the first to build a temple here.
Disciples of Gautama Siddhartha began to visit the place during the full moon in the month of Vaisakh (April–May), as per the Hindu calendar. Over time, the place became known as Bodh Gaya, the day of enlightenment as Buddha Purnima, and the tree as the Bodhi Tree.
Several Buddhist temples and monasteries have been built by the people of Bhutan, China, Japan, Myanmar, Nepal, Sikkim, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Tibet and Vietnam in a wide area around the Mahabodhi Temple.

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Vaishali

Situated at Eastern part of India, very closed to Patna (Capital Headquarter of Bihar), surrounded by banana and mango groves as well as rice fields.

Lord Buddha visited Vaishali frequently and at Kolhua, close by, preached his last sermon. To commemorate the event, Emperor Ashoka, in the third century B.C. erected one of his famous lion pillars here. A hundred years after the Mahaparinirvana of the Buddha - Vaishali hosted the second great Buddhist council. Two stupas were erected to commemorate this event. Jainism, too, has its origins in Vaishali, for in 527 B.C., Lord Mahavir was born on the outskirts of the city, and lived in Vaishali till he was 22. Vaishali is then twice blessed and remains an important pilgrim center for both Buddhists and Jains, attracting also historians foraging for the past.
On the outskirts of Vaishali stood the grand double storied Buddhist monastery. Buddha often discoursed here. He extended spiritual enfranchisement to women by admitting them to the Holy Order which was founded here. Legend has it that on one of his visits, several monkeys dug up a tank for his comfortable stay and offered him a bowl of honey.

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Sarnath

Sarnath is the deer park where Gautama Buddha first taught the Dharma, and where the Buddhist Sangha came into existence through the enlightenment of Kondanna. Sarnath is located just 13 kilometres from Varanasi in Uttar Pradesh, between central and East India. 
After attaining Enlightenment the Buddha, leaving Uruvela, travelled to the Isipatana to join and teach them. He went to them because, using his spiritual powers, he had seen that his five former companions would be able to understand Dharma quickly. While travelling to Sarnath, Gautama Buddha had to cross the Ganges. Having no money with which to pay the ferryman, he crossed the Ganges through the air. When King Bimbisāra heard of this, he abolished the toll for ascetics. When Gautama Buddha found his five former companions, he taught them, they understood and as a result they also became enlightened. At that time the Sangha, the community of the enlightened ones, was founded. The sermon Buddha gave to the five monks was his first sermon, called the Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta. It was given on the full-moon day of Asalha Puja. Buddha subsequently also spent his first rainy season at Sarnath at the Mulagandhakuti.

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Saravasti

It was one of the six largest cities in India during Gautama Buddha's lifetime. The city is located in the fertile Gangetic plains in the Uttar Pradesh. 
It was the capital city of the kingdom of Kosala, and its king was called Pasenadi, who was a disciple of Buddha. It is a beautiful city with vast amounts of agriculture and diversity. Buddhaghosa says that, in the Buddha's day, there were fifty-seven thousand families in Savatthi, and that it was the chief city in the country of Kasi Kosala. 
The Buddha passed the greater part of his monastic life in Savatthi. His first visit to Savatthi was at the invitation of Anathapindika, whom he met in Rajagaha. The main monasteries in Sravasti were the Jetavana and the Pubbarama. Savatthi also contained the monastery of Rajakarama, built by Pasenadi, opposite Jetavana. Not far from the city was a dark forest called the Andhavana, where some monks and nuns went to live. Outside the city gate of Savatthi was a fisherman's village of five hundred families.

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Kushinagar

Kushinagar It is an important Buddhist pilgrimage site, where Gautama Buddha attained Parinirvana. Situated 51 km east of Gorakhpur in Uttar Pradesh. It is one of the four important religious destinations for Buddhists.
One of the main attractions of the place, the Niravana Chaitya or the Main Stupa, was excavated by Carlleyle in 1876 and stands at a height of 2.74 meters. A copper vessel was unearthed at this site and it bore an inscription in ancient Brahmi, which stated that Lord Buddha's remains had been deposited there. The Stupa was restored and its chamber was ceremoniously closed in 1927, in the presence of 16 Buddhist priests. Several gold, silver and copper plate-inscriptions were deposited inside, recording the facts of discovery and identification of the monument.

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Sanchi

Sanchi is a small village in Raisen District of the state of Madhya Pradesh / Central India. Known for its "Stupas", it is the location of several Buddhist monuments dating from the 3rd century BC to the 12th CE and is one of the important places of Buddhist pilgrimage. 
The 'Great Stupa' at Sanchi is the oldest stone structure in India and was originally commissioned by the emperor Ashoka the Great in the 3rd century BC. Its nucleus was a simple hemispherical brick structure built over the relics of the Buddha. It was crowned by the chatra, a parasol-like structure symbolizing high rank, which was intended to honour and shelter the relics.